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Assignment Briefs 10-25-2022

1.1 Explain how risk-taking contributes to the achievement of positive outcomes for individuals

Learning Resource Diploma Unit 2092

Risk Taking and Risk Management in Adult Care criteria 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.4

Learning Outcome 1 Principles of risk management, assessment and outcome based practice

1.1 Explain how risk-taking contributes to the achievement of positive outcomes for individuals

 

Quote by Christy Raedeke: ‘ If there is no risk, there is no reward” Some people say ‘no pain no gain!’

So, how does risk taking contribute to the achievement of positive outcomes for individuals?

For most people risk taking is part of everyday life; we all take risks as when doing everyday things such as crossing the road, driving a vehicle, making decisions, doing the things we normally do. We, largely, take this for granted!

However, for vulnerable adults, risk taking is something that needs to be planned and risk assessed to make sure that the risk taking will be safe. Overall, a balance needs to be found between taking the planned risk and keeping an individual safe from harm.

There are many benefits to positive risk taking:

If this balance can be found this means that an individual can be given choices and control over their lives. Positive risk taking means that individuals can operate to the boundaries/limits of their own potential and this can result in feeling of success and positivity; meaning that individuals have overcome adversity to achieve their own aspirations. Risk taking can offer individuals control and empowerment and the ability to make choices and decisions.

Clearly, there are many benefits; however, an assessment must never eliminate the need for protection and safeguarding and the need to work within organisational policies, procedures and safe practices in line with duty of care.

1.2 Explain the impact of a risk-averse culture on person centred practice and the well- being of individuals

A risk averse culture is one which resists giving individuals the freedom and choice to make their own choices, to move and operate independently in their own internal and external environments; to prevent and impede empowerment.

The impact of a risk averse culture is as follows:

It can damage confidence and prevent the development of self esteem It can prevent them from developing new skills

It can prevent individuals from taking responsibility for their own lives

It can prevent accountability and the realisation that there are consequences for making decisions and making mistakes

It prevents individuals from exercising their emotions It can prevent them from succeeding

It inhibits empowerment

It can prevent risk taking from being regarded as a good and positive experience

https://www.frontiersupport.co.uk/the-benefits-of-positive-risk-taking/

1.3 Explain how supporting others to balance risks and rights informs practice

Good practice with regard to risk taking must always be shared with other professionals; it helps them to:

Recognise the limitations of the individuals they are required to support and follow the wording of care and support plans

Recognise the boundaries of acceptable and unacceptable risk taking Support them to personalise or individualise activities

Support them to work within policy wording and follow organisational procedures and practices

Minimises errors and poor practices

Minimises concerns and complaints for the organisation

Minimises poor feedback from client, their family members and advocates Helps to bring about the most positive outcomes

1.1 Explain how risk-taking contributes to the achievement of positive outcomes for individuals

Learning Outcome 2 Understand issues relating to mental capacity and consent

2.1 Evaluate the links between consent, risk management and safeguarding

What do these terms mean?

Consent means: ‘permission for something to happen or agreement to do something’ Risk management means: ‘forecasting and evaluation of risks together with the identification of procedures to avoid or minimize the impact’

Safeguarding means: to protect from harm or damage with an appropriate measure’

So, what binds these three and what is the relationship between them?

The 6 safeguarding principles bind these three: these are:

1) Empowerment: adults to be encouraged to make their own decisions as a result of having been given all information and support and for options and possible consequences of making a decision made clear. Empowerment helps individuals to build confidence and resilience

2) Prevention: a strategy must be agreed and put into place to minimise potential harm or abuse

3) Proportionate: agreements must be made to balance safety with responses which do not overtake or attempt to control or intrude on the decision made by the individual; their needs and wishes should remain central and paramount to the decision that has been made

4) Protection: the fourth principle encourages adults to find ways to protect themselves and includes them in conversations about how this can be upheld

5) Partnerships: working in partnership with agencies to be able to find solutions to bring about the most positive outcomes

6) Accountable: ensuring that all partners act responsibly and remain accountable for decisions made and actions taken

So, to now be able to answer the question let’s consider how these relate to consent, risk management and safeguarding:

Consent: principles 1, 3, 4 relate to consent. All vulnerable adults should be given the freedom and autonomy to be able to make their own decisions and have their own choices. This retains their sense of confidence, individuality and identity, and offers them empowerment.

Proportionate: however, although vulnerable adults must be given empowerment any decision or choice must also be balanced with an agreement maintain safety

Protection: working alongside the principle of empowerment there must be an emphasis made on encouraging vulnerable adults to consider ways to be able to protect themselves.

Risk management: principles 2, 3 relate to risk management: again, a preventative strategy must be put into place which balances risk with safety as risk of injury or harm must be avoided wherever possible; However, a balance must be found between potentially placing a vulnerable adult at risk of injury or harm and ensuring that their individuality and human rights are upheld. Therefore, the result of any risk assessment must be proportionate.

Safeguarding: principles 4, 5, 6 relate to safeguarding: a safeguarding process must ensure that  a  vulnerable  adult  is  protected  from  injury  or  harm;  this  can  involve supporting an individual to find ways to protect themselves and make informed decisions or protection can be achieved when others make best interest decisions. When others become involved in the best interest process this involves working in partnership; the partnership should include the vulnerable adult and those working within both internal and external teams to be able to bring about the most positive outcomes. These teams remain accountable for ensuring that all partners act responsibly and remain accountable for decisions made and actions taken.

be achieved when others make best interest decisions. When others become involved in the best interest process this involves working in partnership; the partnership should include the vulnerable adult and those working within both internal and external teams to be able to bring about the most positive outcomes. These teams remain accountable for ensuring that all partners act responsibly and remain accountable for decisions made and actions taken.

https://www.berkshiresafeguardingadults.co.uk/3-adult-safeguarding-practice/33-managing-risk/

2.2 Identify the key provisions of legislation regarding mental capacity and explain how these relate to the service

Key provisions are as follows:

The Mental Capacity Act (MCA) was introduced in 2005 and applies to all people in the UK aged 16 and over

The five key provisions/principles of The Mental Capacity Act are:

1) It ensures that no individual can assume a persona has capacity unless proved otherwise. A care service should not treat people as incapable of making a decision unless all practicable steps have been tried to help them.

2) It aims to protect and empower individuals who may lack the mental capacity to make their own decisions about their care and treatment.

3) A person should not be treated as incapable of making a decision because their decision may seem unwise

4) It informs individuals about what they can do in advance so that they can make decisions about their future and their affairs

5) Before doing something to someone or making a decision on their behalf, consider whether the outcome could be achieved in a less restrictive way.

So, now add to your answer how this legislation relates to the service you provide and deliver…

2.3 Describe the support available when mental capacity needs to be assessed

How would you support someone who does not have capacity?

In most cases there are individuals supporting a vulnerable adult who are already present to be able to provide support when mental capacity needs to be assessed; most likely these individuals will be family members, friends, neighbours, advocates, health professionals such as GP, District Nurse, Occupational Therapists. These are the people who ae most likely to know the individual the best, and are therefore, in a position whereupon their contribution becomes valuable.

However, who can assist in situations when there is no additional support available? 1.1 Explain how risk-taking contributes to the achievement of positive outcomes for individuals

Support can be provided by the following:

Independent Mental Capacity Advocate (IMCA):

This is a service that was introduced to support the Mental Capacity Act, 2005; its primary function remains to support individuals who lack capacity to make personal decisions when there is no one else to represent or support other than paid representatives. Examples of when an IMCA can be instructed are when serious medical treatment is required, when a local authority is proposing to make arrangements about accommodation or change of accommodation (this can include transferring an individual from their home into a hospital (if the stay is likely to be longer than 28 days or a longer stay in a care home for more than 8 weeks) An IMCA may also be instructed to support when there is a reason to review a support care package, when safeguarding processes need to be put into place or to provide support during a safeguarding investigation.

2.4 Describe the systems that support individuals to give informed consent

A system comprises all the procedures which go into achieving informed consent from beginning to end;

Systems can be to cover the following:

Capacity assessment Best interest meetings Consent documentation Care planning

End of life planning

Think about the systems you use in your own organisation and choose two to write about

2.5 Explain ways to address situations where consent cannot be given

There are two situations to consider:

1) That the individual is not giving consent due to not understanding the information given or that they want more time to consider their response; when this happens a variety of actions can be taken. You can explain why consent is necessary; sometimes doing this more than once or twice may be required. The individual may not have understood the first time around or the information may have been given to them in a format they cannot understand. 1.1 Explain how risk-taking contributes to the achievement of positive outcomes for individuals.  Find another way of presenting the information; written, pictorial, verbal. Ask a colleague to act for you or involve external professionals.

2) That the individual is incapable of giving a response due to a medical condition such as dementia or anyone without capacity or mental health condition or unconsciousness. In this instance, it may be possible to ask family members or anyone who has the right to make a best interest decision such as someone with Power of Attorney.

 

Learning Outcome 3 Be able to lead the implementation of policies, procedures and practices to manage risk

3.4 Evaluate your own practice in promoting a balanced approach to risk taking and risk management

Is your approach to risk management balanced?

Do you think you are doing the right thing about risk management?

What are the good things about your risk management approaches? How does the organisation benefit from your approach?

How do individual’s benefit?

Is there an equal benefit to both organisation and individual?

Is there anything you could change or improve? Why should the change or improvement take place? What would be the result?

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