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Assignment Briefs 10-25-2022

Collect and critically analyse research data and to use appropriate engineering analysis tools in tackling unfamiliar problems, by the appropriate innovation, use or adaptation of engineering analytical methods.

Assessment Number    

1

Assessment Type (and weighting)

30% weighting - Case based exercises: technical research paper (Part 1, 15%); data analysis portfolio (Part 2, 15%)

Assessment Name

Technical research paper (Part 1); data analysis (Part 2)

Assessment Submission Date

Part 1: 28/10/22; Part 2: 09/11/22

Learning Outcomes Assessed:

LO1: Collect and critically analyse research data and to use appropriate engineering analysis tools in tackling unfamiliar problems, by the appropriate innovation, use or adaptation of engineering analytical methods. (EA3fl)

LO2: Work with information that may be incomplete or uncertain, quantify the effect of this on the Engineering design/analysis/simulation and, where appropriate, use theory or experimental research to mitigate deficiencies. (D1fl)

You must upload your file to the ‘Assessment1’ Turnitin upload link on the Moodle Page before the deadline.

Assessment brief

There are two parts for Assessment 1.

Part 1: Technical research paper, 3 pages (~2500 words), following given template (Please note that the General Assessment Criteria will also apply. Please see Section 16).

Distinction (70% and above)

A cohesive, comprehensive and critical synthesis of the leadership behaviour (styles) and skills literature will be provided. Relationships between concepts will be expertly elicited. A justified and critical evaluation of your own leadership strengths and weaknesses will be set out and theory expertly linked to findings. Reflections will be succinct and insightful. Areas and strategies for personal development will be expertly summarised, comprehensively justified and set out in a detailed leadership development plan.

Extensive research demonstrating use of a wide range of contemporary and seminal sources will be evident. Referencing and English will be excellent. 

Merit (60% -69%)

A clear and critical synthesis of the leadership behaviour (styles) and skills literature will be provided. Relationships between concepts will be well elicited. A clear and critical evaluation of your own leadership strengths and weaknesses will be set out and theory linked well to findings. Areas and strategies for personal development will be well summarised, well justified and set out in a clear leadership development plan.Collect and critically analyse research data and to use appropriate engineering analysis tools in tackling unfamiliar problems, by the appropriate innovation, use or adaptation of engineering analytical methods

Research demonstrating use of a wide range of relevant research sources will be evident. Referencing and English will be good. 

Pass (50%-59%)

A critical analysis of the leadership behaviour (styles) and skills literature will be presented. Relationships between concepts will be clearly drawn out. A critical evaluation of your own leadership strengths and weaknesses will be set out set out with theory linked to findings. Areas and strategies for personal development will be clearly summarised and justified, and set out in a leadership development plan.

Research demonstrating use of a range of relevant research sources will be evident. Referencing and English will be satisfactory. 

Fail (Below 50%): Students who do not meet the requirements of the Pass criteria will not successfully complete the assessment activity.

  • You need to produce a technical research paper, using appropriate style and contents. The topics need to be agreed with tutor beforehand.

Elements of Assessment

Weight

Part1: Technical  research paper: (uploaded in Turnitin)

%

Content – Clarity, identification & comments;

 

(1)  Contents and structure: Right structure, with proper heading/subtitles. Balancing of text and figures/tables.

40

(2)  In depth research and analysis of data

30

Referencing:

 

     Appropriate and proper referencing, with right sources

20

Format

 

     Technical paper format, general structure and clarity of layout, standard of spelling and grammar.

10

Total Mark

100

Marking Scheme

 

Specific Assessment Criteria:

 

(Please note that the General Assessment Criteria will also apply. Please see Section 16).

Distinction (70% and above)

A cohesive, comprehensive and critical synthesis of the leadership behaviour (styles) and skills literature will be provided. Relationships between concepts will be expertly elicited. A justified and critical evaluation of your own leadership strengths and weaknesses will be set out and theory expertly linked to findings. Reflections will be succinct and insightful. Areas and strategies for personal development will be expertly summarised, comprehensively justified and set out in a detailed leadership development plan.

Extensive research demonstrating use of a wide range of contemporary and seminal sources will be evident. Referencing and English will be excellent. 

Merit (60% -69%)

A clear and critical synthesis of the leadership behaviour (styles) and skills literature will be provided. Relationships between concepts will be well elicited. A clear and critical evaluation of your own leadership strengths and weaknesses will be set out and theory linked well to findings. Areas and strategies for personal development will be well summarised, well justified and set out in a clear leadership development plan.

Research demonstrating use of a wide range of relevant research sources will be evident. Referencing and English will be good. 

Pass (50%-59%)

A critical analysis of the leadership behaviour (styles) and skills literature will be presented. Relationships between concepts will be clearly drawn out. A critical evaluation of your own leadership strengths and weaknesses will be set out set out with theory linked to findings. Areas and strategies for personal development will be clearly summarised and justified, and set out in a leadership development plan.

Research demonstrating use of a range of relevant research sources will be evident. Referencing and English will be satisfactory. Collect and critically analyse research data and to use appropriate engineering analysis tools in tackling unfamiliar problems, by the appropriate innovation, use or adaptation of engineering analytical methods

Fail (Below 50%): Students who do not meet the requirements of the Pass criteria will not successfully complete the assessment activity.

Technical research paper template

This is the title of your article

First A. Author, Second B. Author, Jr., and Third C. Author

Department name of organisation, Name of organisation, Address, City, Country, e-mail address

Abstract—The abstract should not exceed 150 words. It should briefly summarise the essence of the paper and its potential impact: (i) briefly state the problem or issue addressed, in language accessible to a general scientific audience, (ii) briefly summarise the technological innovation or method used to address the problem, (iii) brief summarise results and findings and (iv) give brief concluding remarks on your outcomes. Detailed discussion of these aspects should be provided in the main body of the paper. Note that the organisation of the body of the paper is at the authors’ discretion; the only required sections are Introduction, Methodology, Results, Discussion, Conclusions, and References. Acknowledgements, appendices and subsections are optional.

Keywords—technical publication; scientific article; academic style; journal format; British-English (use 5 to 10 key words)

1. Introduction

This template provides authors with most of the formatting specifications needed for preparing electronic versions of their papers. Words in red and grey should be deleted and replaced by your text in black colour. All standard article components have been specified for three reasons: (i) ease of use when formatting individual papers, (ii) automatic compliance to electronic requirements that facilitate the concurrent or later production of electronic products, and (iii) conformity of style throughout the “journal”. Margins, column widths, line spacing, and type styles are built-in; examples of the type styles are provided throughout this document. Some components, such as multi-levelled equations, graphics, and tables are not prescribed, although the various text styles are provided. The author will need to create these components, incorporating the applicable criteria that follow.

References should be included according to the Harvard style as this style is used throughout the University of Bolton documents. Articles that have not been published, even if they have been submitted for publication, should be cited as “unpublished” (Elissa, unpublished). Papers that have been accepted for publication should be cited as “in press” (Nicole, in press). Capitalise only the first word in a paper title except element symbols. For articles published in translation journals, please give the English citation first, followed by the original foreign-language citation (Yorozu et al., 1987). IEEE is suggesting a book by Young (1989) as a starting point to writing well-structured scientific articles. For more options on Harvard referencing please look at the University of Bolton website (Rudd, 2007; University of Bolton, 2013).

We suggest that you use a text box to insert a graphic (which is ideally of a 300 dpi resolution with all fonts embedded) because this method is somewhat more stable than directly inserting a picture. To have non-visible rules on your frame, click “Format” and from “Shape Styles” select “Line Color” > “Transparency 100%”.

Fig. 1.   Example of a figure caption.

1.       Litrature Review

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

2.       Methodology

2.1    Subsection title

The maximum word number for this article is 3000 words excluding references and the abstract. This template has been tailored for output on the A4 paper size.

2.2    Subsection title

This template is used to format your article and provide consistent style for the text. All margins, column widths, line spaces, and text fonts are prescribed; please do not alter them.

2.2.1     Sub-subsection title (Abbreviations and Acronyms)

Define abbreviations and acronyms the first time they are used in the text, even after they have been defined in the abstract. Do not use abbreviations in the title or heads unless they are unavoidable.

3.       Results

This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section.

This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section. This is your results section.

Please take note of the following items when proofreading spelling and grammar:

3.1 Subsection title (Units)

SI units are encouraged. Avoid combining SI and CGS units, such as current in amperes and magnetic field in oersteds. This often leads to confusion because equations do not balance dimensionally. If you must use mixed units, clearly state the units for each quantity that you use in an equation.

Do not mix complete spellings and abbreviations of units: use “Wb/m2”, not “webers/m2”. Spell units when they appear in text: “… a few henries”, not “… a few H”. Also use a zero before decimal points: “0.25”, not “.25”. Use “cm3”, not “cc”.

3.2 Subsection title (Equations)

Type your equation using either the Times New Roman or the Symbol font; please no other font. Number equations consecutively. Equation numbers, within parentheses, are to position flush right, as in Eq. (1), using a right tab stop. To make your equations more compact, you may use the solidus (/), the exp function, or appropriate exponents.

Italicised Roman and Greek symbols are preferred for quantities and variables, but not for units. Use a long dash rather than a hyphen for a minus sign. Punctuate equations with commas or periods when they are part of a sentence.

                                                a + b  = g                                           (1)                                a  + b  = c.             (1)           (1)

Note that the equation is centred using a centre tab stop. Be sure that the symbols in your equation have been defined before or immediately following the equation. Use “Eq. (1)” instead of “equation (1),” except at the beginning of a sentence: “Equation (1) is ...”. In order to insert an equation you may also use the “Insert” tab and then select “Equation”.

3.3 Subsection title (Common Mistakes)

The word “data” is plural, not singular. The subscript for the permeability of vacuum m0, and other common scientific constants, is zero with subscript formatting, not a lowercase letter “o”. A graph within a graph is an “inset”, not an “insert”. The word “alternatively” is preferred to the word “alternately”, unless you really mean something that alternates. Please do not use the word “essentially” to mean “approximately” or “effectively”. Be aware of the different meanings of the homophones “affect” and “effect”, “complement” and “compliment”, “discreet” and “discrete”, “principal” and “principle”. Do not confuse “imply” and “infer”. The prefix “non” is not a word; it should be joined to the word it modifies, usually without a hyphen.

Fig. 2 Magnetisation as a function of applied field. It is good practice to briefly explain the significance of the figure in the caption. Note that “Fig.” is abbreviated and there is a period after the figure number

There is no period after the “et” in the Latin abbreviation “et al.” The abbreviation “i.e.” means “that is”, and the abbreviation “e.g.” means “for example”.

3.3    Subsection title (Figures and Tables)

It is preferable to place figures and tables at the top and bottom of columns; avoid placing them in the middle of columns. Large figures and tables may span across both columns. Figure captions should be below the figures, while table heads should appear above the tables. Insert figures and tables only if they are cited in the text. Use the abbreviation “Fig. 1”, unless it is at the beginning of a sentence: “Figure 1 shows …”. The word “Table” is not abbreviated.

Table 1. This is a table head.

Table Head

Table Column Head

Table column subhead

Subhead

Subhead

Quantity

Related to quantitya

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     a. Sample of a Table footnote.

In terms of Figure Labels, use 8 point Times New Roman for the fonts. Use words rather than symbols or abbreviations when writing Figure axis labels to avoid confusing the reader. As an example, write the quantity “Magnetisation”, or “Magnetisation, M”, not just “M”. If including units in the label, present them within parentheses. Do not label axes only with units. For example, write “Magnetisation (A/m)” or “Magnetisation, M (A/m)” as in Fig. 2, not just “A/m”.

1. Discussion

This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section.

This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section. This is your “discussion” section.

2. Conclusions

Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions. Compose here your conclusions.

Appendix

Appendices, if needed, should be placed before the acknowledgments.

Acknowledgements

Avoid the stilted expression “one of us (AJW) thanks …”, instead, try “AJW thanks …” or if it is a single author try “The author thanks …”.

References

Eason, G., Noble, B. and Sneddon, I. R. (1955) On certain integrals of Lipschitz-Hankel type involving products of Bessel functions, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. London, Vol. A247, pp. 529-551.

Collect and critically analyse research data and to use appropriate engineering analysis tools in tackling unfamiliar problems, by the appropriate innovation, use or adaptation of engineering analytical methods

Elissa, K. (unpublished), Title of paper if known.

Maxwell, J. C. (1892) A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, 3rd Ed., Vol. 2, Oxford: Clarendon, pp. 68-73.

Nicole, R. (in press) Title of paper with only first word capitalised, J. Name Stand. Abbrev.

Rudd, D. (2007) Cite me, I’m yours - Harvard references, notes, quotations, etc. University of Bolton Library.
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